EUR2PE: The Responsibility to Protect at the Centre of Europe

People

Jason-RalphJason Ralph

Professor Jason Ralph is a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellow.  This involved one year study at the Asia-Pacific Centre on the Responsibility to Protect at the University of Queensland (UQ).  He was recently made Honorary Professor at UQ.  He has recently completed an ESRC funded project The State of the post-9/11 Exception from Bush to Obama and a British Academy funded project British Foreign Policy after Iraq.  He is currently Principal Investigator (PI) on the ESRC funded seminar series Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Liberal Responsibilities in an age of shifting power balances and an RCUK ‘Rights and Ethics in a Security Context’ project.  He is PI and supervisor on the White Rose ESRC DTC PhD network Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Its Problems and Alternatives.  His evidence on the ‘special relationship’ and the use of force was recently published by the British Foreign Affairs Committee. He has also published “Mainstreaming R2P in UK Strategy. Improving the Government’s response to the threat of mass atrocity” with the United Nations Association-UK. You can follow him on Twitter @jasonralph4

Edward NewmanEdward Newman

Professor Edward Newman is editor of the journal Civil Wars. He has recently completed a project on human security and peacebuilding and he is the author of ‘The violence of statebuilding in historical perspective: implications for peacebuilding’, Peacebuilding, vol.1, no.1, 2013 and  ‘R2P: Implications for World Order’, Global Responsibility to Protect, vol.5, no.3, 2013. His interests lie in a number of areas including theoretical security studies, including critical approaches and ‘human security’; intrastate armed conflict, civil war, intervention and political violence; international organizations and multilateralism; and peacebuilding and reconstruction in conflict-prone and post-conflict societies.

Graeme DaviesGraeme Davies

Professor Graeme Davies recently completed with Rob Johns (Essex) and ESRC funded project on Foreign Policy Attitudes and support for war among the British public. He is currently engaged (with Lars Berger) in research on public attitudes to the use of force in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.

Adrian GallagherAdrian Gallagher

Dr Adrian Gallagher joined University of Leeds in 2012 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2015. He recentlycompleted an ESRC funded PhD entitled ‘Genocide and Its Threat
to International Society’ at the University of Sheffield (2007-2010).  He is currently Principal Investigator  the  White Rose University Consortium Project The Responsibility to Protect and Humanity: A Study in the Idea of Human Interconnectedness; and Co-Investigator  on the ESRC funded seminar series Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Liberal Responsibilities in an age of shifting power balances.  He a supervisor on the White Rose ESRC DTC PhD network Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Its Problems and Alternatives.

Alex-Profile-150x150Alex Beresford

Dr Alexander Beresford joined the University of Leeds in 2011 after completing his doctorate at the Universityof Edinburgh’s Centre of African Studies. He currently researches South African foreign policy and, in particular, the politics of South Africa’s diplomacy on the African continent. His recent work includes an article in International Politics titled:  which examines Pretoria’s response to the Libyan crisis and the broader contribution South Africa can make to debates about the future of interventions in Africa. His work is informed by interviews with senior ANC officials and the South African officials responsible for negotiations at the United Nations. His future work will examine Africa’s relationship with the ICC and the Omar al-Bashir controversy.

Christina StefanCristina Stefan

Dr. Cristina Stefan (formerly Badescu) joins the University of Leeds from Canada, where she taught international relations and peace and conflict studies at the University of Toronto and Western University. She is also a Senior Analyst in the Peace & Security unit at the Global Governance Institute in Belgium, and a Senior Fellow at the Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect.  Her research interests span the topics of international security, global institutional responsibility, intervention, the responsibility to protect, human rights, and the peace versus justice “trade-off”.  Her recent research has focused on the evolution and consequences of international norms and institutions, and, more specifically, on the debates surrounding the normative diffusion of the responsibility to protect. Her book, Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Security and Human Rights, was published by Routledge in 2011 and 2012 (paperback). She has published several book chapters and articles on humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect in various journals, such as International Studies Perspectives, Canadian Journal of Political Science, Canadian Foreign Policy, and Security Dialogue.

James Souter

James Souter is Lecturer in International Relations at the School of Politics and International Studies, University of Leeds. His work engages with both contemporary political theory and normative international relations, and addresses ethical questions surrounding asylum, migration, and the responsibility to protect. He is currently contributing to a project entitled ‘The Responsibility to Protect in the Context of the Continuing “War on Terror”: A Study of Liberal Interventionism and the Syrian Crisis’ with Jason Ralph, Rachel Utley and Derek Edyvane, funded by Research Councils UK.  Before coming to Leeds in 2014, James completed a DPhil entitled ‘Asylum as Reparation’ at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford.

BD R2P conf picBenedict Docherty

Ben’s PhD – funded by a POLIS Research Studentship – examines the cases of Cote d’Ivoire, Libya and Syria to assess how tensions over the practice of liberal intervention affect the sustainability of the solidarist society of states typified by R2P, given that R2P legitimates multilateral humanitarian intervention only. Ben has served as a Co-Convenor of the British International Studies Association Postgraduate Network and is currently the PGR Rep of the BISA Working Group on Intervention and Responsibility to Protect.  Since 2013 he has administered the ESRC funded seminar series project – The Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute.

Kalina ZhekovaKalina Zhekova

Kalina Zhekoa is a PhD student at the University of Leeds researching the Question of International Intervention in US Russian Relations between 2009-2014

Daniel Wand

Daniel Wand is a PhD student at the University of Leeds researching the question of liberal responsibilities in an age of shifting power balances.  His research is funded by a +3 ESRC studentship award as part of the White Rose Doctoral Training Centre Network Award.  Prior to joining the University of Leeds Daniel worked in the public law department at a UK Top 20 law firm and was a research assistant in the public international law team at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law. He holds an LL.M. (with distinction) in public international law and an undergraduate degree in law from the University of Sheffield. Daniel is also a director of the Human Security Centre, a not-for-profit international affairs and foreign policy think-tank.

PhotoZain Maulana

Zain Maulana is a PhD student at the School of Politics and International Studies the University of Leeds. His research focuses on the interaction of norm and states’ behaviour. He is examining the process of the socialisation of the Responsibility to Protect in Southeast Asia.

Blake LawrinsonBlake Lawrinson

Blake Lawrinson is an MA student in International Relations at the University of Leeds. Blake is President of the R2P Student Coalition at Leeds, which works on increasing awareness of the R2P and atrocity crimes among students. He holds a BA (First Class Hons) degree in International Relations from the University of Leeds.

Ben WillisBen Willis

Ben Willis is a PhD student in the School of Politics and International Studies at the University of Leeds, where the focus of his research is on atrocity crimes and R2P framing in the case of North Korea. His work is funded by a three-year Leeds Anniversary Research Scholarship. Ben has previously worked as a research assistant for SERIO and within the Individuals at Risk Campaign Team at the International Secretariat of Amnesty International. He holds MA (Distinction) and BSc (First Class Hons) degrees in International Relations from the University of Plymouth. Ben is also a research assistant for Protection Approaches, a not-for-profit human rights NGO that works to improve the protection of people from identity-based violence.

External Collaborators

Garrett W. Brown

Dr. Garret Brown is Reader in Political Theory and Global Ethics at the University of Sheffield.  He is a partner on the White Rose University Consortium Project The Responsibility to Protect and Humanity: A Study in the Idea of Human Interconnectedness and a supervisor on the White Rose ESRC DTC PhD network Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Its Problems and Alternatives.

Aidan Hehir

Dr Aidan Hehir is Director of the Security and International Relations Programme at the University of Westminster, and a Senior Lecturer in International Relations.  He is Co-Invesitgator on the ESRC Seminar Series project Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Liberal Responsibilities in an age of shifting power balances.

James Pattison

Dr James Pattison is a Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Manchester. He is Co-Invesitgator on the ESRC Seminar Series project Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Liberal Responsibilities in an age of shifting power balances. His research interests include humanitarian intervention, the responsibility to protect, the ethics of war,  private military and security companies, and the alternatives to war. His first book, Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Who Should Intervene?, was published by Oxford University Press in 2010. This book was awarded a ‘Notable Book Award’ in 2011 by the International Studies Association (International Ethics Section) and has recently been published in paperback, with a new preface on the intervention in Libya. His PhD on humanitarian intervention was awarded the Sir Ernest Barker Prize for Best Dissertation in Political Theory by the Political Studies Association.  He has recently completed on a four-volume Sage ‘Major Work’ on humanitarian intervention. He has also recently finished a monograph on the ethical issues surrounding the use of private military and security companies, The Morality of Private War: The Challenge of Private Military and Security Companies (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014). His future work will consider the ethics of the alternatives to war. He has published various articles on the ethics of force, including for Ethics & International Affairs, International Theory, Journal of Military Ethics, Journal of Applied Philosophy, Journal of Political Philosophy, and Review of International Studies.

Lars Waldorf

Dr. Lars Waldorf is Senior Lecturer in International Human Rights Law at the Centre for Applied Human Rights, University of York (UK). He is a partner on the White Rose University Consortium Project The Responsibility to Protect and Humanity: A Study in the Idea of Human Interconnectedness and a supervisor on the White Rose ESRC DTC PhD network Responsibility to Protect and Prosecute. Its Problems and Alternatives. He ran Human Rights Watch’s field office in Rwanda from 2002-2004 and reported on genocide trials at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in 2001. He has worked as a consultant for the International Center for Transitional Justice, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, and Front Line Defenders. He has authored numerous book chapters, journal articles, and reports on transitional justice and Rwanda. He has co-edited three books: Remaking Rwanda: State Building and Human Rights after Mass Violence (University of Wisconsin Press, 2011); Localizing Transitional Justice: Interventions and Priorities after Mass Violence (Stanford University Press, 2010) and Disarming the Past: Transitional Justice and Ex-Combatants (SSRC, 2009). He teaches undergraduate and postgraduate courses on international human rights law, transitional justice, and humanitarian intervention.

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